Posted in Bite size learning, Decision Making, Goals, Leadership, Management, personal impact, Relationships

Confident selling …

Our ability to sell correlates to our revenue, and yet it is hard to sell especially when in most cases it is yourself.

We must believe in what we are selling and therefore a good starting point is to decide what result the Client will get if they buy your service.  Write down 3 results they will get if they buy from you:-

nuggets example:-

  1. By attending a nugget workshop you will think differently about the way you work
  2. You will look at your team with “fresh eyes”
  3. Practical actions from relevant training in a shorter period of time

By focusing on results you are giving them the WIFM factor (Whats in it for me?) and you have created a strategy of being customer centric.

Work out how many people you need to see each month to convert into a sale.  The ratio will be high so make sure you book as many appointments or in my case coffee and catch ups.  It might be 8:1, whatever the number keep a track of your conversion rate as it will help predict your cashflow.

When you get to meet them think of the flow of the conversation:-

  • Build rapport
  • Questioning – understand their world – empathy
  • Reflect what you have heard
  • Give examples
  • Tell them how you can help them…

To build rapport really get to know them and remember the things that they value (holidays, family and health) very rarely is it their job.

Think of 3 key questions to follow the rapport:-

  • What sort of training have you had recently?
  • Who have you worked with before?
  • What outcomes were you looking for from the workshops?

Reflect back answers – using case studies “From what I hear is…we have recently worked with …”

If it is not the right fit, don’t be afraid to walk away, it is not right to sell a Rolls Royce when they were in the market for a Mini.

We can appeal at three levels:-

  1. Aspirational – “other companies are buying our workshops”
  2. Emotional – “you will feel so much better having attended”
  3. Fear of missing out – “we only have three places left on the workshop”

Plan your new business meetings and most importantly enjoy them so that people want to work with you.

bev@nuggetsoflearning.co.uk

 

 

 

Advertisements
Posted in Bite size learning, Decision Making, Goals, Problem solving, training

Process Mapping…

The difference between being successful and effective is knowing how you got there.  Success can be luck, it was incredible, however upon reflection there was not necessarily a process to get there.  Being effective has longevity and can lead you to success multiple times.

Taking time out to analyse your process can lead to even greater results.  A good example was the process of cash machines.  When they were first introduced the Banks found that they had high costs on lost cards.  The process they had mapped out, was as follows:-

  • Insert card
  • Enter PIN
  • Request cash
  • Collect cash
  • Retrieve card
  • End

The initial process involved getting the cash out of the machine before the card was returned. Most people were focussed on the money, so, once they had the notes in their hand, they turned away, leaving their card still in the cash machine. Simply by reversing the order of two steps solved the problem – people had to remove their card before they got their money. This small change in the process saved the banks money and also was a more effective process for the customer.

We can process map anything, your morning routine, invoicing, sales, customer returns and setting up a new system.

The most effective way to conduct a process mapping session is as follows:-

  • Map the process – use magic whiteboards or a roll of brown paper, then use post-it notes to log every step of the process
  • Analyse the process – step back and decide whether there is anything missing and who has ownership at certain points of the process
  • Redesign the process – if there are obvious points where the process gets held up, look to redesign
  • Implement & communicate – Follow the process and document it (infographic) share with as many team members as possible
  • Review – after 90 days review with the original process mapping team

Please contact bev@nuggetsoflearning.co.uk for more details

 

Posted in Bite size learning, coaching, Decision Making, Goals, motivation

Creating “work” daily habits…

We find it very easy to shower every morning and clean our teeth, however in work we are sometimes at a loss to know where to start.

In work we need rituals and habits that make it easier for our brain to hit the ground running.  Remember when you learnt to ride a bike how hard your conscious mind was focusing on all the obstacles in your path and now you cycle looking at the view.

There are times when we require new thinking so it is good to challenge our brain however ritualising some of the daily or weekly tasks could free the mind when you want it to really work hard.

Think about habits and routine items within your business:-

  • Posting on social media, set a time each day where you go in and have the same system, of the platforms you visit, so that the tour becomes familiar and easy.
  • Set aside time in the week when you read the relevant articles for your business. Accumulate them each day so when you hit that weekly reading spot you can get in the zone.
  • Allocate a specific time to email and touch base with your clients, have it as an appointment in your diary so that it happens.
  • Have some daily disciplines in place, write down what you want to achieve each day and check your work in progress schedule.
  • Think about your daily habits, when do you open your email, when do you start project work and most importantly when do you eat.
  • Connect with friends and colleagues by booking coffees and lunches, ensure you have a pipeline at all times of connections, business and pleasure.
  • Review your day so that you can constantly improve your systems and processes.

Please do get in touch if we can help at nuggets to create some new rituals for you and your business bev@nuggetsoflearning.co.uk

 

 

Posted in Bite size learning, Decision Making, Emotional Intelligence, Goals, motivation

Think and feel in numbers…

Liv Boeree a famous Poker player and her excellent TED talk explained how we quantify our thinking which gives us more precise language.

We use estimate words rather than defining what we actually mean.  I will “probably” meet you for a drink.  Instead we could talk in numbers “There is a 60% chance I will meet you for a drink”.

We often talk about a “gut” instinct however the reality is that you need slow careful analysis.  Your gut does not park your car or end your marriage.  Behind your gut is slow careful analysis as to whether it is doable based on size or financial implications, all about numbers.

When we are successful we might say we were lucky however if we go into the next project with just luck, we would fail.  We have strategic edge based upon our skill level which will be calculated by the number of times you have practised deploying that skill, again all about numbers.

As a poker player Liv Boeree leaves us with three summaries:-

  • Your gut is your friend and so is a cost benefit analysis
  • Success is sweetest when you achieve it across a large sample size
  • The future is unknown but you can dam well estimate it

 

bev@nuggetsoflearning.co.uk

Posted in coaching, Emotional Intelligence, Goals, Learning, Relationships

The difference between coaching & mentoring…

Coaching is … a process that enables learning and development to occur by the coach asking powerful questions which leads to different thinking and ultimately different performance.  The coach requires a variety of styles and skills and techniques that are appropriate for each session.

Mentoring is… helping an individual to make significant changes in their work or thinking. This can often be done remotely or face to face.  Mentors look at the big picture and with no vested interest and can make bold suggestions.

Coaches can have first hand experience of the line of work or they can be a qualified coach from outside bringing new thinking in.

Mentors are normally more experienced or skilled in the field of work they are advising on.

Line Managers can use coaching techniques whereas the best mentors often have no prior relationship with the mentee.

Coaches ask powerful questions and don’t give advice, and the mentor provides direction and advice.

Mentors and coaches provide a neutral sounding board and total confidentiality, they are both invested in assisting an individual to reach their goals.

Coaching is about learning rather than “teaching” it is much more ask than tell.  The insight gained by working with a coach will lead to enhanced effectiveness.  Mentoring is helping individuals to develop their career by drawing on their own experiences.

Working with a coach and mentor can lead to new thinking and an enhanced performance.

bev@nuggetsoflearning.co.uk

Posted in Bite size learning, Decision Making, Goals, Leadership, Management

Strategy conversation…

It is so easy to focus on the here and now and not have those big conversations that can change the direction you are currently focusing on.

To ensure that the discussion is effective you have to set the scene and provide a framework:-

  • Meeting booked in the diary well in advance
  • A theme agreed being long term discussion on growth, business improvement, expansion anything in the future…
  • One to five year time line
  • Everyone given time to prepare
  • Suspend judgement during the meeting to ensure that there is free thinking
  • Discuss points in agreement and ones in disagreement
  • Use structure by using the boxes below to guide the discussion and to create a strategy

Use a facilitator to ensure that you stay on track and that you have the tools and resources that will ensure open discussion.

Screen Shot 2018-10-02 at 09.03.20

Posted in Decision Making, Goals, Leadership, Management, Problem solving

Complexity to simplicity…

Facilitating a meeting is to take a complex situation and make it easy for a team to see it simplistically.

True definition of facilitation is as simple as “To make easy”.

It starts with a good brief, clarity on what the purpose of the meeting is and expected outcomes.  From this initial discussion the Facilitator can then design an event using tools and exercises that will fit around the objectives.

The structure and tools are designed to create collaborative contributions.  They must be varied and interactive and to anticipate different energy levels.

The tools and techniques can range from an initial ice breaker to set the tone and rapport of the day.  Flip charts around the room to ensure movement, card sorts and post-its bringing colour and vibrancy to content.

The Facilitator will ensure that the day is kept on track from a time and agenda perspective.

There must be ample opportunities for joint problem solving and lots of discussion.  To ensure that items are always relevant it is wise to create a car park flip chart so that you can say:- “That is really good point however can we cover it separately and therefore put on the car park”.

Neutrality is really important and is often best achieved if the Facilitator comes from outside of the company.

The Facilitator is there to make sure that you get the most out of your team members and  have relevant actions and outcomes.

Please do get in touch for nuggets to facilitate your next meeting. bev@nuggetsoflearning.co.uk