Posted in Bite size learning, Goals, motivation, personal impact, training

90 minutes…

The World Cup is made up of 90 minute matches.  Within that crucial time period, is all the highs and lows any individual can experience.

  • Exhilaration
  • Despair
  • Delight

The game of two halves split into 45 minute modules.  We witness collaboration, joy and agony, a team working towards achieving goals.  The match can be amazing when the team work together it is as if magic has occurred in front of your eyes.

Their performance is based on those 90 minutes especially in a World Cup, they have to perform at that one moment in time.

The brain concentrates for 45 minutes and then needs a break to begin the next 45 minutes.  At your desk set yourself goals and imagine your own World Cup made up of two halves.  Focus on that one achievement for a pure 45 minute period.  Be aware of how much help you need from your team.  The best players are supported and putting egos to one side don’t take all the glory.

The best learning can occur in 90 minutes, when a Facilitator takes a team through a topic, they learn at the same moment in time as each other.  Ideas and discussion are shared and everyone feels they are in a safe environment.

The benefits of learning in 90 minutes, less time away from desk so a cost effective methodology of training a team. The atmosphere created can be like on the pitch, interactive, stimulating and challenging.  Booking 5 x 90 minute modules means the team meet up once a fortnight and share their learning.

For Management and Leadership topics please contact bev@nuggetsoflearning.co.uk 

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Posted in Bite size learning, Goals, mindfulness, Time management

Book summary of “When” by Daniel Pink

The scientific secrets of perfect timing

 “We all know that timing is everything. Trouble is, we don’t know much about timing itself.” Daniel Pink

 Pink explains that we use our gut to make decisions on when we should eat or sleep when in actual fact there are scientific answers.

The book covers three main lessons:-

  • Our emotions run through the same cycle everyday
  • Knowing how you “tick” will help you do your best at work
  • Taking a break or an afternoon nap is not counterproductive, if anything it helps you save time

If you divide the day in three parts the obvious answer would be morning, afternoon and evening. A global study by Cornell University analyzing 500 million tweets in 84 countries with 2.4m users. The sociologists used a linguistic inventory word count to ascertain the dominating emotion for each of those parts of the day. Their findings were:-

  • Morning peak – Whether its right after waking up or 1- 2 hours later, most people feel pretty good early in the day
  • Afternoon – the tough period after lunch
  • Evening rebound – after work you have a gear change and enter recovery mode

The same variant pattern applied across genders, race and age. Pink described this as Peak, Trough and Recovery.

Similar studies produced the same results, they looked at standardised testing of Danish students. Every hour later in the afternoon produced a decrease in the students score, so not only emotions but performance alters according to time of day.

The results would suggest that in business we would be best allocating tasks accordingly:-

  • Peak – analytical tasks – intensive thinking and vigilance
  • Trough – administrative activities
  • Recovery – creative activities less intense focus

Corporations don’t focus on when only the what and how and yet the variance in human performance has an impact.

Even with this study in mind you still here people say “I’m a night owl” or “I love to get up early”.

Other studies can analyse your chronotype whether you are a Lark, Owl or something else which Pink describes as Third bird.   Larks are the ones that love to get up early. The Owls can get to work at 9.00pm and don’t like getting up early. The Third Birds are the people who are neither early or late just follow the standard pattern which is the largest group.

The old fashioned view that breaks were a waste of time is changing with the spotlight on mental health. A time tracking company DeskTime did a study using millions of data points determining the ideal break to be 17 minutes for every 52 minutes of work. That means one hour down for every three hours.

The other study Pink shared was the “nappuccino”, you have a coffee after lunch and then set a timer for 20 minutes. It takes 7 minutes to fall asleep, you wake up a little later refreshed with the caffeine kicking in.

Viewing human performance through “When” could alter the way you manage your time and your life.

Please do get in touch for a workshop on Time Management bev@nuggetsoflearning.co.uk

 

 

 

Posted in Bite size learning, Goals, Management, Time management

Summary of Agile

The principles of Agile can be applied to any team they are not exclusive to software development.

The Agile manifesto with its 12 principles was created back in 2001. Underpinning the concept is creating a learning culture which came out of the Toyota Production System. This was the Lean principle one of the foundations of Agile.

All of the 12 principles can be put into 3 main categories:-

  • Clarity & Transparency Delivery – approaches to improve how teams understand their system of work
  • Learning & Leaning – Approaches to improve and optimise team processes
  • People focus – Approached to creating an autonomous and engaged culture

The set of principles increases the awareness of the team to different approaches that lead to improvement over time.

Clarity & Transparency Delivery

  1. Regular measurements & milestones
  2. Clear intent & continuing prioritisation – vision and goals
  3. Understand what is valuable – to the customer
  4. Visualised work – white boards

Learning & Leaning

  1. Minimise waste
  2. Repeating tasks to spot incremental changes
  3. Limit work in progress
  4. Short feedback loop

People focus

  1. Team effort and collective ownership
  2. Empowered to improve as a team
  3. Collaborative learning
  4. Driving process through people interaction

 

Posted in Bite size learning, Emotional Intelligence, Goals, Leadership, motivation, personal impact

Entrepreneurial Spirit…

Many organisations are now looking for that edge, employees who although part of a company have independent thinking.  The group operate as entrepreneurs, thinking their department is a business and being open to new thinking and new ways of working.

In Sahar Hashemi’s book “Switched On” she gives a route as to how to engage with your entrepreneurial spirit.

  • Believe anyone can do it – use the skills of everyday life in your life at work.
  • Put yourself in your customers’s shoes – Jeff Bezos famously has an empty chair at every meeting for the client
  • Get out of the office – Engage with the wide world – leave the office and know what is going on around you
  • Become clueless – Forgetting how you do things – dump the baggage or the language “we have always done it this way”
  • Prototype – What does your product or service look and feel like? – gain insight from something tangible
  • Notch up Nos – Change your attitude to a “no” – try harder and see a “no” as a challenge
  • Bootstrap – Get things done with limited resources, work really hard and then harder
  • Take 100% of yourself to work – 100% effort + 100% personality = being you

 

Each of these tips are new habits that you need to work into your diary so that they become rituals and disciplines that you adopt.

Involve your team with the ideas and initiatives you will then be a group of entrepreneurs totally switched on.

For a workshop on creative thinking please contact bev@nuggetsoflearning.co.uk 

Posted in Bite size learning, Decision Making, Goals, Leadership

Big Picture Thinking…

We all need to have a view internally and externally of an organisation to gauge new opportunities and threats from competitors.

On a nugget workshop we conduct an exercise called “Being Savvy” the idea being that you can understand where areas of growth might be and how to communicate to your team.

There are three areas of being “Savvy” and when they connect – you have your eyes wide open.

See the diagram below:-

Savvy

The delegates fill each of the circles – e.g.:-

  • Organisationally savvy
    • Understand all internal policies
    • Know the right people within the company who make this happen
    • As an individual match the culture of the organisation
    • Embody the values and therefore are a really good role model
  • Business savvy
    • Know the results and revenue details of the company
    • Aware of main competitors
    • Clear view of everyones objectives
    • Sponsors new product and services
  • Contextually savvy
    • Aware of the impact of new legislation
    • Understand the political landscape and the effect on the company
    • World events awareness to ensure that the organisation supports or champions the right causes
    • UK culture, society trends that may impact the business

This is a good start to get your employees adopting “Big Picture Thinking” – there is a world out there so we need to understand the impact on us inside and outside.

Please do get in touch for a workshop on Big Picture Thinking – bev@nuggetsoflearning.co.uk 

 

Posted in Bite size learning, coaching, Goals, Leadership, Management, Relationships

Keeping stars…

The old saying was “People leave People not jobs” therefore we must treat are star employees like people.

Invest in a relationship with them, understand their values, what do they get out of bed for in the morning.  Some people say work is work, however there is always something behind their motives.  Work is a need to fulfil all other areas of life.

Therefore when we are in work how can you ensure they stay on the journey with you:-

1. Get to know your employees.  

Meet with them for 1:1 meetings once a fortnight.  Take time within those meeting to go beyond current workload.

2. Make it fun

Look for opportunities to build enjoyment into their role.  The brain absorbs more when it is relaxed and having fun.  Laughter releases endorphins, all the ingredients of creating the right atmosphere for work.

3. Meaningful interactions

Employees who understand the big picture and feel connected to the purpose of the business, foster more loyalty.  Get your team members to connect with clients make them feel a part of the whole thing.

4. Harness strengths

Identify the strengths of your employees and make sure they are exaggerated.  Leveraging what some-one is good at, could be a better investment than developing an area of weakness.  The opportunities within their strengths can lead to new areas of expertise.

5. Invest 

Invest your time and money in your employees.  Pay for them to be developed and give them your time to understand the future they see for themselves.

Please do contact bev@nuggetsoflearning.co.uk for a workshop on Career Development

Posted in Bite size learning, coaching, Decision Making, Goals, mindfulness

Life and a mobile phone…

This weekend my phone suddenly switched off, and my daughter said “It’s too cold”.  Suddenly the phone did not seem that dissimilar to us as humans.  The functioning capacity was directly affected by adverse weather.

Therefore taking the mobile phone as a metaphor how similar is it to the life you live.

  • It often recharges at night, as we do with a decent 8 hours if we are lucky.
  • When we are lost it is very good at getting us to where we need to get to.  Having goals and a clear direction in life often means you find the path you have chosen.
  • If we have too many Apps/windows open at one time it drains the battery.  This can be compared with too much going on in your mind and losing the ability to make good decisions.
  • Phones can be unpredictable, switching themselves off and always running out of battery when you least expect it.  We often have mood swings which can be triggered by something personal or as simple as a change in our working environment.
  • The immediacy of a phone for communication is good and bad, it is always there.  We are the same with our powers of conversation, we can speak at any moment in time, however the skill of choosing the right time and when to be silent.
  • When a phone is in Airplane mode we can use the functions, but we are not in contact with the outside world.  Should we be in Airplane mode when with our family, we are functioning but not being disturbed by the outside world.
  • Rarely do we go for the full shut down on the phone.  This could be the time when we are on holiday, there is no signal on the beach so why not put yourself into total shut down.

Just like mobile phones we do have the ability to control the choices we make in life, we are the operator of our lives.

Please do contact bev@nuggetsoflearning.co.uk for 1:1 coaching or a workshop on communication.