Posted in Bite size learning, Decision Making, Goals, Leadership, Management, personal impact, Relationships

Confident selling …

Our ability to sell correlates to our revenue, and yet it is hard to sell especially when in most cases it is yourself.

We must believe in what we are selling and therefore a good starting point is to decide what result the Client will get if they buy your service.  Write down 3 results they will get if they buy from you:-

nuggets example:-

  1. By attending a nugget workshop you will think differently about the way you work
  2. You will look at your team with “fresh eyes”
  3. Practical actions from relevant training in a shorter period of time

By focusing on results you are giving them the WIFM factor (Whats in it for me?) and you have created a strategy of being customer centric.

Work out how many people you need to see each month to convert into a sale.  The ratio will be high so make sure you book as many appointments or in my case coffee and catch ups.  It might be 8:1, whatever the number keep a track of your conversion rate as it will help predict your cashflow.

When you get to meet them think of the flow of the conversation:-

  • Build rapport
  • Questioning – understand their world – empathy
  • Reflect what you have heard
  • Give examples
  • Tell them how you can help them…

To build rapport really get to know them and remember the things that they value (holidays, family and health) very rarely is it their job.

Think of 3 key questions to follow the rapport:-

  • What sort of training have you had recently?
  • Who have you worked with before?
  • What outcomes were you looking for from the workshops?

Reflect back answers – using case studies “From what I hear is…we have recently worked with …”

If it is not the right fit, don’t be afraid to walk away, it is not right to sell a Rolls Royce when they were in the market for a Mini.

We can appeal at three levels:-

  1. Aspirational – “other companies are buying our workshops”
  2. Emotional – “you will feel so much better having attended”
  3. Fear of missing out – “we only have three places left on the workshop”

Plan your new business meetings and most importantly enjoy them so that people want to work with you.

bev@nuggetsoflearning.co.uk

 

 

 

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Posted in Bite size learning, coaching, Leadership, Management, Relationships

Ask not tell…

If anyone tells you to do anything you want to resist.  Recently some-one told me to do something and I was in a volunteering capacity and I was incredibly resistant.  Asking for help and support always gets a better response.

A potential Client was explaining a team member’s response to attending a team meeting.  The employee had called a colleague and said they would not bother coming back to the office to come to the weekly meeting.  The Manager was obviously irritated and asked the colleague to phone them straight back and tell them they had to attend.

I asked why as the Manager they had not made the call.  They could have asked

“Why do you think that your attendance at the meeting would not add value?”

The brain always has to answer a question, and questioning the value they would bring to a meeting is far harder to excuse yourself.

Ask not tell leadership style is much more empowering.  Whenever a team member comes to you with a problem the best approach is to always ask them what they would do first rather than offer out a solution.

Another example is a request for holiday during a busy period, instead of an immediate no, ask how they think the company will survive with their absence.  Asking is all about pushing responsibility and getting the brain to work for itself.

Telling some-one not to be late, will make the serial offender repeat their actions.  Asking them what they think they can do to ensure they are on time, makes them do the thinking.

Ask not tell is more empowering to you as leader and to the recipient.

www.nuggetsoflearning.co.uk

Posted in Bite size learning, Decision Making, Goals, Leadership, Management

Strategy conversation…

It is so easy to focus on the here and now and not have those big conversations that can change the direction you are currently focusing on.

To ensure that the discussion is effective you have to set the scene and provide a framework:-

  • Meeting booked in the diary well in advance
  • A theme agreed being long term discussion on growth, business improvement, expansion anything in the future…
  • One to five year time line
  • Everyone given time to prepare
  • Suspend judgement during the meeting to ensure that there is free thinking
  • Discuss points in agreement and ones in disagreement
  • Use structure by using the boxes below to guide the discussion and to create a strategy

Use a facilitator to ensure that you stay on track and that you have the tools and resources that will ensure open discussion.

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Posted in Decision Making, Goals, Leadership, Management, Problem solving

Complexity to simplicity…

Facilitating a meeting is to take a complex situation and make it easy for a team to see it simplistically.

True definition of facilitation is as simple as “To make easy”.

It starts with a good brief, clarity on what the purpose of the meeting is and expected outcomes.  From this initial discussion the Facilitator can then design an event using tools and exercises that will fit around the objectives.

The structure and tools are designed to create collaborative contributions.  They must be varied and interactive and to anticipate different energy levels.

The tools and techniques can range from an initial ice breaker to set the tone and rapport of the day.  Flip charts around the room to ensure movement, card sorts and post-its bringing colour and vibrancy to content.

The Facilitator will ensure that the day is kept on track from a time and agenda perspective.

There must be ample opportunities for joint problem solving and lots of discussion.  To ensure that items are always relevant it is wise to create a car park flip chart so that you can say:- “That is really good point however can we cover it separately and therefore put on the car park”.

Neutrality is really important and is often best achieved if the Facilitator comes from outside of the company.

The Facilitator is there to make sure that you get the most out of your team members and  have relevant actions and outcomes.

Please do get in touch for nuggets to facilitate your next meeting. bev@nuggetsoflearning.co.uk

Posted in coaching, Goals, Leadership, motivation, Problem solving

Highlights and Lowlights…

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We often use review tools when we are facilitating a team or strategy day and one of our favourites is Highlights and Lowlights.

Delivering a course that has been effective for a long period of time and gives a good return is a Highlight but might not necessarily be a surprise.

However a module within a workshop on email led to writing a book “Making email work for you” this was a Highlight and a huge surprise.

We can all identify with the time that Brexit is taking and that comes as a Lowlight but really no surprise.

The Lowlights that are surprise are those ideas that are brilliant in your head, however when they get executed they are not quite as effective as you thought.  Famous examples might be the Dyson washing machine.

Reviewing anything and everything is a leadership quality.  We can use the four boxes to review:-

  • Life
  • Work
  • Health
  • Diet

You will be surprised with the data you get from a review and importantly what you go onto do with the knowledge.

Please do get in touch bev@nuggetsoflearning.co.uk

Posted in coaching, Emotional Intelligence, Leadership

Love, privilege and hard-work…

On Saturday we were very honoured and lucky to hear Duncan Piper, Director of the Dyson Institute speak.

The basis of his talk was the journey to the interview at the Dyson Institute.  He was a very good presenter in the right amount of drama and intrigue as to where the tale was going to end.

In summary he broke up his holiday to fly back for the interview with Sir James Dyson.  It meant putting his beach clothes to one side and flying from Barcelona to Heathrow to be met by his father and then driven to Wiltshire to the Dyson Institute.  The interview goes well and then as he is sitting in the car to drive back to Heathrow he gets the call to say he has the job.

Duncan describes in that moment the realisation that he got the job because the man sitting on right hand side driving the car had made it happen.  His father and mother had provided unconditional love and above all trusted that he would always find his way.  As parents it is so hard not to interfere and look at the world through our own filter which is a generation away from our children.

The other component on that day for Duncan was the realisation how privileged he was. He said he was a white young middle classed male who had received an excellent education.  We often assume everyone has the same opportunities, and we seldom stop to acknowledge our good fortune.

Privilege and love can drive you very far, however you do have to join the party with hard-work.  Duncan describes being bullied at school and reaching 6ft 3 and constantly falling over.  At the age of 14 he discovered he could run and he ran up Primrose Hill constantly to the point that school realised he could run.  From there other areas fell into place, if you could get good at running by hard-work, could you not do anything if you worked hard.

The recipe is truly brilliant – love, privilege and hard-work.  Forge ahead with confidence and appreciate the people and opportunities around you and work hard.

Please do contact bev@nuggetsoflearning.co.uk for colourful coaching to develop your confidence.

 

Posted in Bite size learning, Emotional Intelligence, Goals, Leadership, motivation, personal impact

Entrepreneurial Spirit…

Many organisations are now looking for that edge, employees who although part of a company have independent thinking.  The group operate as entrepreneurs, thinking their department is a business and being open to new thinking and new ways of working.

In Sahar Hashemi’s book “Switched On” she gives a route as to how to engage with your entrepreneurial spirit.

  • Believe anyone can do it – use the skills of everyday life in your life at work.
  • Put yourself in your customers’s shoes – Jeff Bezos famously has an empty chair at every meeting for the client
  • Get out of the office – Engage with the wide world – leave the office and know what is going on around you
  • Become clueless – Forgetting how you do things – dump the baggage or the language “we have always done it this way”
  • Prototype – What does your product or service look and feel like? – gain insight from something tangible
  • Notch up Nos – Change your attitude to a “no” – try harder and see a “no” as a challenge
  • Bootstrap – Get things done with limited resources, work really hard and then harder
  • Take 100% of yourself to work – 100% effort + 100% personality = being you

 

Each of these tips are new habits that you need to work into your diary so that they become rituals and disciplines that you adopt.

Involve your team with the ideas and initiatives you will then be a group of entrepreneurs totally switched on.

For a workshop on creative thinking please contact bev@nuggetsoflearning.co.uk