Posted in Bite size learning, Emotional Intelligence, Leadership, personal impact, Relationships, Stress management

What does social media do for our confidence…?

We bring our children up to believe they can have everything.  In schools we now give medals for partcipating, so the shock of hard work and results in the world of work are a surprise. What has eroded confidence before we enter business…?

Many of our children are gaming and constantly interacting with social media.  We know that the addictive dopamine keeps their interest and whilst they compete for results they are rarely shared.   In order to feel good instead of face to face feedback they are counting the number of likes on a post.  Turning to a device instead of a person, means they lack the ability to form deep meaningful relationships.  The approval of their peers to grow self esteem is coming from an electronic perspective and not a human.

In order to believe in ourselves we have to be happy in real life and not on our social media platforms.

Genuine praise and recognition takes time and is not an instant when we are in the work place.  The younger generation have not learnt the ability to wait for anything, everything can be obtained immediately.  You don’t even have to wait for the next episode you can download the whole box set.  Instant gratification rather than waiting for a reward which would give us pleasure and contentment.

Job satisfaction is arduous, you have to work hard and build new relationships, you have to have patience.  We find a lot of the younger generation want to quit straightaway as they have never had to wait before.

To survive in work we need a good self image and lots of feedback to grow our self esteem.  This needs to be authentic and genuine.

Corporates are not helping to create the right environment for this generation.  Companies are still very number orientated and there is very little investment in helping people to build confidence.  We lack good leaders taking time to guide their direct reports.  We need to  develop social skills by role modelling, the little innocuous comments that make all the difference. “How’s your Dad?”  Through these little asides trust is formed.

Social media plays with our confidence across all generations, watching your friends and family having a lovely life on a screen rather than being with them.  We are social beasts, put down the phone and go and have lunch with a colleague.

Please do get in touch with nuggets on developing confidence “Fearless motivation” bev@nuggetsoflearning.co.uk

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Posted in Bite size learning, Leadership, motivation, Relationships

Creating a team charter…

Working in a team has two elements: what we do and how we do it.  The second part is the team culture you create and this is formed by rituals and a set of behaviours you may share or desire to share.  To cultivate what feels comfortable and cohesive as a group it is worth setting some ground rules, guiding principles that you can roll into a team charter.

Providing an agreement people can follow as to how they work together provides processes, responsibilities and obligations.

A good starting point is to ask some key questions:-

  • What is important to us as team?
  • What values do we have about how we interact and what underpins our actions?
  • How do we communicate with each other?
  • How do we address conflict with each other?
  • How do we want to be recognised as individuals?
  • What do we want to put in place to support us in times of pressure?

Brainstorm the questions together and with some of the answers in your mind start to document a charter.  A good starting point is to think of the overall purpose of the charter.

To identify citizenship behaviours that link to the charter identify positive and negatives.  Ask the team to write down five behaviours that build the team and five behaviours that bring the team down.  We shall call these groups “Fair” and “Foul”.

Combined with the first exercise you will have created your team charter.

Please do get in touch if you would like nuggets to facilitate such an exercise bev@nuggetsoflearning.co.uk 

Posted in Bite size learning, coaching, Leadership, mindfulness

Step out of your comfort zone…

We unconsciously committ to life within a comfort zone as there are no guarantees in a stretch zone.  However the more time we step into stretch the more comfortable it gets at doing its job and the more it stretches.

Has there been an occasion recently when you were forced to stretch and make that leap out of your comfort zone.  It is often at times where we have no control and we have not made the choice that we grow.

For anyone who has attended a nuggets workshop will know I surround the room with flip charts and I have a mind map that I work from for the agenda.  I arrived at a Clients without the flip charts luckily the trusted mind map was there.  Not only were the flip charts not packed but also one of the key exercises a set of laminated headlines.

I was in stretch for the next 3 hours.  The first job was to recreate the flip charts I had prepared.  The exercise of headlines turned out better than the original, I asked delegates to use their phones to find sensational headlines.  Of course trainers are always advocating phones on silent, however the liberation of using a phone was brilliant and also made the exercise far more current and relevant.

It is not a place that we choose to step into, however we adapt and survive, so try and step out more often of your comfort zone as stretch is there ready and waiting to grow.

Please do get in touch for workshops and coaching bev@nuggetsoflearning.co.uk

Posted in Bite size learning, Leadership, Management, motivation, training

Do and Don’ts for interviews

The New Year is the time when you start to think about new team members. The interview is the first view of your company and should be a memorable occasion.

Working with a company a few years ago we decided to turn the recruitment and selection process into more of an assessment day with the emphasis on “fun”.

The day started at 7.30am with breakfast in the kitchen area.  The candidates had a fun icebreaker relevant to the company.  We then had three exercises so we split the group accordingly.  The activities were as follows:-

  • Speed interviewing – Just 3 questions asked in rotation by 3 people
  • Sending an email – testing their communication skills
  • Spelling and Grammar test

We then brought the group back together for Q & A on the company and to enjoy the leftovers of the croissants.  We received really good feedback how it was so much more refreshing than a normal interview.

However if you are going down the more traditional route have a look at some Dos and Don’ts I have compiled:-

Dos

Don’ts

Offer refreshments No comfort or welcome
Explain Agenda and timings No time scale
Job spec – clear outline of position No job spec
Brief overview of Company (must be brief) 80:20 rule No company info
Behavioural interview questions

Skills questions that are relevant to the job

Hypothetical questions

Questions about CV

Outside interests

Template to write answers to questions – for each candidate No notes
The same format and interview for every candidate No structure or format – different with every candidate
Appitude test eg.

Send an email

Spot spelling and grammar errors

No basic testing
Introduce candidate to the team No introductions
Another member of the team to take to the exit – “Ask how they managed interview today?” Meet the same person throughout interview
Follow up No follow up

Please do get in touch if you would like nuggets to provide Behavioural interview training or just simply to design something fun for your recruitment process.

bev@nuggetsoflearning.co.uk

Posted in Bite size learning, Goals, Leadership, personal impact

Becoming “You”

Currently reading the book “Becoming Michelle Obama” which poses the question to all of us do we know who we really are.

We have so many roles in life, eg Daughter, Mother, Sister, Director and even the mundane Weekly Bin Collector.  Do we forget who we are to ourselves?

  • Who do you want to be?
  • What do you want to be known for?
  • Do you like yourself?

These are all good questions to ask yourself at the start of the year.  It is a good time to use the year before to review who you are and to make changes to become the person you want to be.

Review last year:-

  • What were your 3 main achievements?
  • Which people were key to your success and happiness?
  • What feedback did you receive and what mattered?

Moving into the new year decide whether the achievements got you closer to being who you want to be, and if not, what will you set out to achieve this year.

Think of supportive and unsupportive people were they a drain or a tap, and ensure that you surround yourself with the right people.

Feedback is gift we all take it, however it is whether you do something with it that matters.  What changes can you make based on others feedback.  The positive comments can be strengthened and constructive feedback can be assessed if fair and developed.

Becoming is a journey which we should review every year as our roles in life change we become who we want to be each time.

Please do get in touch for 90 minute workshops and 1:1 coaching bev@nuggetsoflearning.co.uk

Posted in Bite size learning, Decision Making, Goals, Leadership, Management, personal impact, Relationships

Confident selling …

Our ability to sell correlates to our revenue, and yet it is hard to sell especially when in most cases it is yourself.

We must believe in what we are selling and therefore a good starting point is to decide what result the Client will get if they buy your service.  Write down 3 results they will get if they buy from you:-

nuggets example:-

  1. By attending a nugget workshop you will think differently about the way you work
  2. You will look at your team with “fresh eyes”
  3. Practical actions from relevant training in a shorter period of time

By focusing on results you are giving them the WIFM factor (Whats in it for me?) and you have created a strategy of being customer centric.

Work out how many people you need to see each month to convert into a sale.  The ratio will be high so make sure you book as many appointments or in my case coffee and catch ups.  It might be 8:1, whatever the number keep a track of your conversion rate as it will help predict your cashflow.

When you get to meet them think of the flow of the conversation:-

  • Build rapport
  • Questioning – understand their world – empathy
  • Reflect what you have heard
  • Give examples
  • Tell them how you can help them…

To build rapport really get to know them and remember the things that they value (holidays, family and health) very rarely is it their job.

Think of 3 key questions to follow the rapport:-

  • What sort of training have you had recently?
  • Who have you worked with before?
  • What outcomes were you looking for from the workshops?

Reflect back answers – using case studies “From what I hear is…we have recently worked with …”

If it is not the right fit, don’t be afraid to walk away, it is not right to sell a Rolls Royce when they were in the market for a Mini.

We can appeal at three levels:-

  1. Aspirational – “other companies are buying our workshops”
  2. Emotional – “you will feel so much better having attended”
  3. Fear of missing out – “we only have three places left on the workshop”

Plan your new business meetings and most importantly enjoy them so that people want to work with you.

bev@nuggetsoflearning.co.uk

 

 

 

Posted in Bite size learning, coaching, Leadership, Management, Relationships

Ask not tell…

If anyone tells you to do anything you want to resist.  Recently some-one told me to do something and I was in a volunteering capacity and I was incredibly resistant.  Asking for help and support always gets a better response.

A potential Client was explaining a team member’s response to attending a team meeting.  The employee had called a colleague and said they would not bother coming back to the office to come to the weekly meeting.  The Manager was obviously irritated and asked the colleague to phone them straight back and tell them they had to attend.

I asked why as the Manager they had not made the call.  They could have asked

“Why do you think that your attendance at the meeting would not add value?”

The brain always has to answer a question, and questioning the value they would bring to a meeting is far harder to excuse yourself.

Ask not tell leadership style is much more empowering.  Whenever a team member comes to you with a problem the best approach is to always ask them what they would do first rather than offer out a solution.

Another example is a request for holiday during a busy period, instead of an immediate no, ask how they think the company will survive with their absence.  Asking is all about pushing responsibility and getting the brain to work for itself.

Telling some-one not to be late, will make the serial offender repeat their actions.  Asking them what they think they can do to ensure they are on time, makes them do the thinking.

Ask not tell is more empowering to you as leader and to the recipient.

www.nuggetsoflearning.co.uk