Posted in Bite size learning, Change management, coaching, motivation

Cultural change working for you…

We all need to reinvent our ways of working, refresh how things are going.  Look at your bottom line, what can you do differently to generate more revenue.

Organisations invest in workshops around cultural change, to reignite motivations and most importantly incorporate different working practices.

Stop and think about what changes you need to make even as an individual by taking the headings of a Cultural Change Ladder.

Environment 

What do you need to happen in your environment?

  • Describe your current situation
  • How is it a reflection of you and your company?
  • What are your insights and what will you do/change?

Behaviours 

What changes do you need to make in your behaviours?

  • What habits do you notice?
  • What do you tend to do daily/weekly/monthly?
  • What reactions do you notice in others of the impact of your behaviour?
  • What will others see/hear/feel to know you have made changes in your behaviour?

Capabilities

What capabilities do you want to change?

  • Which skills and capabilities are you currently using?
  • Do you have any skills or capabilities that are under utilised?
  • What do you need to do more of?
  • What are challenges are head of you, and identify the capabilities required?

Beliefs 

What beliefs do you want to have about yourself?

  • What do you currently believe about yourself?
  • What is important and positive and what is negative?
  • What will you need to believe in yourself to make changes happen?
  • What values will you need to draw on to change the beliefs you have now?

 

To make this blog practical, answer the questions and create an action list.  For further support please contact bev@nuggetsoflearning.co.uk

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Posted in Change management, Emotional Intelligence, mindfulness, motivation, personal impact, Stress management

The right attitude…

Last Monday I was fortunate enough to attend a talk by James Shone from the charity

“I Can and I Am”.

James has an amazing story from being a House Master to applying to be a Head and in his words landing the “dream” job.  Part of the selection process was a medical, where James discovered he had a brain tumour.  Surgery and a journey of recovery began with the “dream” job disappearing, James found a new purpose.

He set up the charity, “I Can and I Am” to inspire confidence in secondary school children through inspirational talks.

He started on Monday by sharing his own story and then talking to us as parents about how we can work with our children to give them the confidence to believe they can do anything.

His first top tip UFO Vs DBI, the abbreviations stand for Up, Forward and Out and Down, Back and In.  If we always look up and forward and out, we can see the big sky with all the possibilities.  Down back and in, begins that self limiting inner dialogue and where we over analyse events.

As a teacher he was keen for us to understand the progress made by teaching being evaluated by outside influence e.g. Ofsted.  However we are still focusing very much on a funnel all the good stuff goes in, however the system only focuses on that very tight tube at the end of the funnel, academic results.

Teenagers today are spending so much time on their phones which as we know releases the addictive Dopamine in our brain.  We need to unlock other passions and all of this can start at 14 years of age.

As parents we can look to a 3B continuum:-

  • Between – controlling (when they are young and dependent)
  • Beside – journey with them (understanding their life and the gradual steps of independence)
  • Behind – I am here if you need me – the ultimate interdependence

Every child needs a confidence boost and James used the example of an ordinary balloon.  We can either choose to inflate their confidence or deflate, knocking their self worth.  If they are constantly deflated it is like driving a car with a flat tyre, progress is slow and damaging.

There are four things we can ensure:-

  1. Belong – do they feel part of something, do they have a role
  2. Valued – embedding a growth mindset (Carol Dweck) “I can’t do it” should become “I can’t do it yet…”
  3. Good at something – look at the multiple intelligences by Professor Howard Gardner.  We all have strengths in areas that need to be uncovered by the people around us
  4. Future secure – setbacks are viewed as a springboard.  We may fall down but how quickly do we get back up and focus on the future.

We must give our teenagers authentic praise by ensuring we say:-

  • “I noticed…
  • “I heard…
  • “I saw…

Firsthand commentary of what they are doing well and it is our job to build those affirmations in their heads.

We have responsibility to demonstrate our own love of life be the role model with the right attitude.

We might not have a story as big as James Shone, however we can ensure that we smile and dance when we put the dishwasher on.  Talk about your work with passion and share your life with your teenagers.  Behaviour is contagious lets get them talking and off the screen.

 

 

 

 

Posted in Bite size learning, Goals, mindfulness, motivation

Complete a goal on a high…

The achievement of completing a goal can make you feel proud and satisfied, however there is another part of you that mourns the loss of the work.  The adrenalin and energy you poured into the goal can fade very quickly if you have not adopted long term habits that can be sustained you begin to question the accomplishment.   Avoid creating a vacuum when the goal is complete.

The feelings people might feel at the end of the goal are:-

  • Disappointment
  • Feeling lost
  • Exhausted

Disappointment may occur if the goal was to easy or if you were so unrealistic you did not achieve it .  There is a fine balance between stretch and achieveable.  To avoid disappointment ensure that you have milestones in place along the journey.  Those milestones can be new rituals that you keep in place long after the goal.  If you want to increase your revenue you would set a target and the milestones would be to make one new business call a week and one meeting a month (they will stay in place once you have smashed the revenue).

Feeling lost, could well mean there is not enough rigour around the goal.  Did you map it out and plan what it looked like.  Identifying where you want to be at certain points lets you know that you are on track.  If you see setting goals as a journey, you need to know which destination point you have arrived at, and how long it took you to get there.  This often means that you might need to tweak it.  Companies split the year into quarters which is good way of assessing where you are e.g. by Q1 …

Exhausted is very close to exhilaration and elation.  Build into your goal planning, celebrating and relaxing.  If we don’t mark the finishing line the fatigue will run into the next set of goals.

Please do contact bev@nuggetsoflearning.co.uk for a Goals workshop.

Posted in Bite size learning, coaching, Goals, motivation

Set “real” goals…

If you have set some goals for January make sure they are realistic.  Goals that are too big can be incredibly inspiring until you don’t meet them and then they can be more demotivating than motivating.  The fall out is much greater, ensure you stick to the bounds of reality.

Goals are assisted by healthy habits and rituals.  Every goal should have bite sized steps to lead to the big goal.  A daily ritual that gets you ever closer to the ultimate, will be far more motivating.

You need to surround yourself with the right people.  Negative  or toxic energy from people who doubt whether you will achieve your goals will drain the positivity leading you to the achievement.

Focus on your overall well being, a good nights sleep is vital, so therefore ensure you don’t look at your phone or tablet before bed.  The messages you receive you take to bed, but scientifically the blue light will reduce the sleep-inducing hormone melatonin.

Get started on those ‘real’ goals.  Author Jodi Picoult said the importance of avoiding perfectionism perfectly “you can edit a bad page, but you can’t edit a blank page”.

Most importantly get organised, avoiding touching things two or three times.  Everything has a place, have systems and processes in play that lead to your goals.

Make your goals visual, look at them everyday and then they will become reality.

For a goals workshop, please contact bev@nuggetsoflearning.co.uk

 

Posted in Bite size learning, coaching, Goals, Leadership, motivation

Why goal setting matters…?

 Harvard Business School Goal Story

In the book “What They Don’t Teach You in the Harvard Business School”, Mark McCormack tells the story of a study conducted on students in the 1979 Harvard MBA program. In that year, the students were asked, “Have you set clear, written goals for your future and made plans to accomplish them?” Only 3% of the graduates had written goals and plans; 13% had goals, but they were not in writing; and a whopping 84% had no specific goals at all.

10 years later, the members of the class were interviewed again, and the findings, while somewhat predictable, were nonetheless astonishing. The 13% of the class who had goals were earning, on average, twice as much as the 84% who had no goals at all. And what about the 3% who had clear, written goals? They were earning, on average, ten times as much as the other 97% put together.

Write your goals down for 2018 or speak to nuggets about a workshop on goal setting.

Please contact bev@nuggetsoflearning.co.uk

Posted in Bite size learning, coaching, Emotional Intelligence, Leadership, mindfulness, motivation

Dose of Happiness…

We create our own happiness by choosing the state that we go into, however how much are we aided by the chemicals in our brain.  Science colliding with our emotional intelligence.

At a talk at our son’s school they explained how teenagers can steer their behaviour with bearing in mind the dosage they need to be happy.   It is healthy for teenagers to hug and want companionship and yet social media does not give them that intimacy or immediate closeness.  The wrong elements of the happiness can be exaggerated, the teenagers can become addicted to posting and the reaction of their friends.

Simon Sinek of TED talk fame and for the book “Start with Why”, explained when writing his book “Leaders Eat Last” the chemicals that makes us happy.

He used the mnemonic EDSO however at my son’s school last week they made it far more catchy – DOSE of happiness.

DOPAMINE – motivates us to achieve incremental goals. It is the greed element of the brain it makes us feel good when we tick things off the to-do list and it can become highly addictive.

OXYTOCIN – creates intimacy, trust and the feeling that some-one will protect you.  Mothers and babies and lovers feel this when they are protected and loved, the feeling of safety.

SEROTONIN – provides the feeling of significance, pride, status.  It drives us to seek the recognition of others.  I want to do it so that my family are proud of me.  It reinforces relationships within a group, it can give cohesion to a team.

ENDORPHINS – keeps us going during work outs or runs, it helps us endure difficulties.  We have the same rush when we laugh.

If we were put them into a table:-

Chemicals for Happiness Key phrase Example
DOPAMINE One more Setting and achieving milestones
OXYTOCIN Intimacy and safety One-on-ones with Manager
SEROTONIN Loyalty Making the team proud
ENDORPHINS No pain Late night working

The right DOSE can steer you through an organisation and life.   Check-in to see whether you are being exposed to the right amount in each area.

Please do get in touch for a workshop on Happiness bev@nuggetsoflearning.co.uk

Posted in coaching, Decision Making, Emotional Intelligence, mindfulness, motivation, Stress management

Being proactive…

Our behaviour is a function of our decisions and choices not our conditions.

We have the freedom to choose our responses despite the circumstances.  We will always have our own imagination, conscience as to what feels right or wrong and our very own independent will to choose.

Reactive people are:-

  • driven by circumstances, conditions whether they be social or physical
  • if the weather is good, they feel good, if the weather is bad they feel bad
  • when people treat them well, they feel well, when people mistreat them they become defensive
  • mistakes are blamed on others, rationalised as being inevitable
  • focus on concerns
  • use “have” language

Proactive people are:-

  • driven by values
  • carry their own weather, rain or shine
  • mistakes are acknowledged instantly and corrected, and learnt from
  • focus on things they can influence
  • use language with choice
  • Eleanor Roosevelt said “No-one can hurt you without your consent”

Our ability to live a life of choice is our ability to focus on what we can influence and not focus on the concerns we cannot change.

Please do contact nuggets for a workshop on Proactive Thinking bev@nuggetsoflearning.co.uk